Principles Of Good Design

Principles Of Good Design

26 May, 2017
Admin Team
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The principles of design are the rules a designer must follow to create an effective composition that cleanly delivers a message to her audience.

If you’re a business just starting out, you might be tempted to go wild and combine the first five typefaces and colors that catch your eye, believing you’re creating something fresh and new.

You will probably find yourself with a design that is muddled, unfinished, or well, just plain ugly.

Design, just like any other discipline, adheres to a strict set of rules that work beneath the surface to make the work appear more stable and balanced. If a design is missing that balance, it will be weak and ineffective.

Here are the 6 basic principles of design that will make your next project stand out.

1. Emphasis
Say we are creating a poster for an event, what is the first piece of information an audience needs to know?

The speaker? Or the venue? What about the day and the cost of attending?

So we design in a way that communicates that order. If the speaker’s name is the most essential information, place it in the centre or make it the biggest element on the poster. Or put it in the strongest, boldest type.

2. Balance and Alignment
Never forget that every element you place on a page has a weight – this can come from colour, size, or texture.

Just like you wouldn’t put all your furniture in one corner of a room, you can’t crowd all your heavy elements in one area of your composition. Without balance, your audience will feel as if their eye is sliding off the page.

3. Contrast
Contrast creates space and difference between elements in a design, so they work harmoniously together and are readable. How will your audience know what is most important if everything is in bold?

You’ll notice most designs only feature one or two typefaces, that’s because contrast can be effective with one or two strong fonts in different weights. If you use too many fonts, you could dilute and confuse the message.

Design, just like any other discipline, adheres to a strict set of rules that work beneath the surface to make the work appear more stable and balanced. If a design is missing that balance, it will be weak and ineffective.

4. Repetition
If you limit yourself, you will soon find you’ll have to repeat elements, that’s ok! Repetition unifies and strengthens a design. Anyone thinking about a startup knows one of the first things you need is a strong logo to feature on your website, business cards, social media and more. Brand identity? Another term for repetition.

5. Proportion
Proportion is the visual size and weight of elements in a composition and how they relate to each other. It helps to approach a design in sections, instead of as a whole. Grouping related items can give them importance at a smaller size. Proportion can be achieved only if all elements of your design are well-sized and thoughtfully placed.

6. White Space
White space is the empty page around the elements in your composition. Its not sitting there doing nothing, it’s creating hierarchy and organisation. Our brains naturally associate space around an element with importance and luxury. It’s telling our eyes that objects in one region are grouped separately.

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